Introductions

Economics, Politics, Philosophy, History and Culture
Forum rules
Always add something of value to the discussion and have fun. Mind your language, no porn, no libel, no trolling and no personal attacks.

Please note, views expressed on the forum do not necessarily represent the views of Mises UK. the Mises UK Council, Mises UK Faculty or Mises UK members. Membership of this forum is open to anyone world wide who is interested in civil discussion.
Phi est aureum
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:30 am

Re: Introductions

Post by Phi est aureum » Fri Mar 30, 2018 4:07 am

Howdy!

I live in the US. I am a Christian. I have a wife and two children. I was a basic progressive as a teenager, although I didn't think much about politics. Then I heard about Ron Paul and became a minarchist/constitutionalist. Luckily, Ron mentioned Economics In One Lesson. And Mises and Rothbard and the Mises Institute. And so of course, I now am a voluntaryist/ancap.

User avatar
Neodoxy
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2018 4:05 am

Re: Introductions

Post by Neodoxy » Fri Mar 30, 2018 4:54 am

Hello,

Neodoxy reporting in. I'm in my early 20's and a somewhat recent college graduate putting off selling my soul to Satan (going to gradschool). I have the mixed fortune of being an American.

I've come a very long way in my intellectual journey, moving from hard libertarian to anarcho-capitalist to pragamatic liberal with a preference for traditionalism, although in the current intellectual climate I've been increasingly identifying myself simply as anti-left, as much as I hate to say that.

I'm very eclectic in my thought. I am an economist by training, but increasingly I'm interested in a general synthesis of the social sciences, particularly through institutional analysis and sociology. Society is complex and I find talking about the market economy without discussing broader sociology to often be uninformative. I have a strong interest in philosophy and history, although my biggest fault is that I tend to be too much of a broad strokes thinker. Philosophically I moved from Rand to existentialism and Nietzsche and now I'm coming around to a more Platonic and Aristotelian standpoint.

True atheism is banal and Elinor Ostrom was the greatest social scientist of modern times. Hayek>Mises for contributions to thought but Hayek<Mises for politics and work on a coherent and powerful political worldview.

Feel free to PM me if you would like to chat about my weird views.

AustroThomist
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:54 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by AustroThomist » Fri Mar 30, 2018 10:19 am

Hello everybody,

Italian living in London here.
I am especially interested in the link between Natural Law tradition and libertarianism/paleoconservatism.

I teach at university, which means I am constantly surrounded by smirking liberal leftist statists who hate our civilization and come up with all sorts of social experiments.
Hopefully this forum will give me a break from their nonsense.

Ut unum sint
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 11:54 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Ut unum sint » Fri Mar 30, 2018 7:27 pm

Evening all,

Tory anarchist/paleolibertarian. Roman Catholic (Ordinariate of OLW). Cantab.

Ecclesiastical historian and historian of Christian political thought, c. 1000-1700.

In spare time: sings in Choirs (or Quires, if you prefer); plays the piano; MCs at Masses; practises martial arts; and tries (often, in vain) to love and serve his neighbour. Also likes: flowers; wine; genealogy; and academic dress.

Oh, and:

Age: 19
Sex: M
Location: Cambridge

Three guesses.
Et unam, sanctam, cathólicam et apostólicam Ecclésiam

Anarcho-Conservative
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 7:50 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Anarcho-Conservative » Fri Mar 30, 2018 8:02 pm

Ut unum sint wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 7:27 pm
Evening all,

Tory anarchist/paleolibertarian. Roman Catholic (Ordinariate of OLW). Cantab.

Ecclesiastical historian and historian of Christian political thought, c. 1000-1700.

In spare time: sings in Choirs (or Quires, if you prefer); plays the piano; MCs at Masses; practises martial arts; and tries (often, in vain) to love and serve his neighbour. Also likes: flowers; wine; genealogy; and academic dress.

Oh, and:

Age: 19
Sex: M
Location: Cambridge

Three guesses.
Is that you Mr Martland? :D :D

User avatar
Clayton
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:24 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Clayton » Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:20 pm

How to destroy your life by reading a book on economics

It was 2007. I had some savings and was thinking about moving into the stock market. However, right after I married in 2000, I had put our life savings into the stock market and got slaughtered in the dot-com bubble. This time, I was going to play it smart. I should understand what I'm doing before investing. I happened to be browsing books in Barnes & Noble one weekend and saw "Basic Economics" by Thomas Sowell. Perfect, I thought. I know who Sowell is, I've heard him in radio interviews, and I need to understand the basics of how the economy works before investing so that way I can make informed investing decisions.

Even though I had been raised a religious conservative, Sowell's book was an experience in having my mind blown over and over again. "Holy crap, I had no idea how many destructive effects government interference in the market has." Many times I laid the book down with a thousand-mile stare out the window, aghast at the immensity of it all. Through reading Sowell, I discovered that there is a school of economics called Austrian economics. I searched online and started reading Mises, Hoppe, Rothbard, Hulsmann and all the usual suspects. Sowell had blown my mind but reading Austrian theory had put me in possession of a microscope of human behavior - the science of human action, or praxeology. I felt like I had broken out of the trunk of the car and gotten not into the passenger's seat, but the driver's seat.

Over the course of the next 10 years I would lose my marriage, my life savings, my friends and every last shred of human dignity as my life spiraled out of my control - mostly resulting from the aftermath of my divorce. Of course, it's silly to say that reading a book on economics destroyed my life but the two events did happen to roughly coincide in my life. The more I understood the causes of economic destruction in society, the more economic destruction I experienced in my life. I have since moved on from that phase of my life but let it be a warning to others: be careful what you read, it just might destroy your entire life.

Osterreicher
Posts: 23
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 9:57 am

Re: Introductions

Post by Osterreicher » Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:42 am

Clayton wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:20 pm
How to destroy your life by reading a book on economics

It was 2007. I had some savings and was thinking about moving into the stock market. However, right after I married in 2000, I had put our life savings into the stock market and got slaughtered in the dot-com bubble. This time, I was going to play it smart. I should understand what I'm doing before investing. I happened to be browsing books in Barnes & Noble one weekend and saw "Basic Economics" by Thomas Sowell. Perfect, I thought. I know who Sowell is, I've heard him in radio interviews, and I need to understand the basics of how the economy works before investing so that way I can make informed investing decisions.

Even though I had been raised a religious conservative, Sowell's book was an experience in having my mind blown over and over again. "Holy crap, I had no idea how many destructive effects government interference in the market has." Many times I laid the book down with a thousand-mile stare out the window, aghast at the immensity of it all. Through reading Sowell, I discovered that there is a school of economics called Austrian economics. I searched online and started reading Mises, Hoppe, Rothbard, Hulsmann and all the usual suspects. Sowell had blown my mind but reading Austrian theory had put me in possession of a microscope of human behavior - the science of human action, or praxeology. I felt like I had broken out of the trunk of the car and gotten not into the passenger's seat, but the driver's seat.

Over the course of the next 10 years I would lose my marriage, my life savings, my friends and every last shred of human dignity as my life spiraled out of my control - mostly resulting from the aftermath of my divorce. Of course, it's silly to say that reading a book on economics destroyed my life but the two events did happen to roughly coincide in my life. The more I understood the causes of economic destruction in society, the more economic destruction I experienced in my life. I have since moved on from that phase of my life but let it be a warning to others: be careful what you read, it just might destroy your entire life.
I don't want to sound disrespectful but that's a post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy.
"Any life needs seem short to people who measure it in terms of pleasures, which through their empty nature are incapable of completeness."- Seneca

User avatar
Jon Irenicus
Posts: 158
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 9:36 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Jon Irenicus » Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:28 am

Interesting to see all the varieties of libertarian here... I'm probably a bit more open to minarchism than I used to be, but not as a summum bonnum. I should also add I share quite a few "alt right" perspectives, so I'm not much of a plumbline libertarian, but obviously still a Hoppean.
Former overlord of the original Mises forum.

User avatar
Clayton
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:24 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Clayton » Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:25 pm

Osterreicher wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:42 am
I don't want to sound disrespectful but that's a post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy.
Yes, it is... lol. That's why I pointed out in the body of the post that it's silly to think that reading a book can destroy your life. It's just a click-baity title, FWIW.

User avatar
FvS
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 3:03 am

Re: Introductions

Post by FvS » Mon Apr 02, 2018 4:20 am

Hello,

Libertarian, race realist, and White preservationist from the United States. Hated by the Left because I'm a libertarian and pro-White. Hated by the Right because I'm against vice prohibition and mercantilism. Hated by (most) libertarians because I don't want open borders, am pro-White, and am not completely averse to using the State to suppress the Left.
"Most whites do not have a racial identity, but they would do well to understand what race means for others. They should also ponder the consequences of being the only group for whom such an identity is forbidden and who are permitted no aspirations as a group." - Jared Taylor

Post Reply