Introductions

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michel
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 3:03 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by michel » Mon Apr 02, 2018 3:13 pm

Hi!

I'm michel92 from the old forums / LibertyHQ forums.

Several years ago I leaned towards socialism, until I tried to calculate the cost of every social benefit I thought should be given to every citizen, measuring it against Brazil's (I'm brazilian) annual tax revenue, which I already found very high. That lead me to a search for what was wrong with society. If my plan could not be paid for, than there was something I didn't know. For a while, I believed a resource based economy was the answer, after watching the Zeitgeist documentary. Thanks to an ancap brazilian youtuber I got to know the Mises Brazil Institute circa 2011. Some months later I was already an anarchist.

I mostly lurk these days, and it will probably be the same here. I had to become a member, though. I hope that the discussions focus on the pursuit of truth, and not the defense of one's own position.

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Jon Irenicus
Posts: 158
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 9:36 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Jon Irenicus » Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:34 pm

FvS wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 4:20 am
Hello,

Libertarian, race realist, and White preservationist from the United States. Hated by the Left because I'm a libertarian and pro-White. Hated by the Right because I'm against vice prohibition and mercantilism. Hated by (most) libertarians because I don't want open borders, am pro-White, and am not completely averse to using the State to suppress the Left.
My own views have converged to this over time as well, but on the bolded the following comes to mind:
“Beware that, when fighting monsters, you yourself do not become a monster... for when you gaze long into the abyss. The abyss gazes also into you.”
That said, it all depends on what you mean by it.
Former overlord of the original Mises forum.

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z1235
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:07 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by z1235 » Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:45 pm

z1235 (or “z”) from the old mises.org forum and LibertyHQ.

Voluntaryist/ancap. Previously literally everywhere and typically with strong convictions. The gap/jump from anything else to voluntaryism is so large and life-changing that makes one much more humble and conscious about ever strongly attaching one’s self to any belief or concept.

Currently reading Huemer’s “The Problem of Political Authority” and blown away by its simplicity, clarity, depth, and persuasiveness. I’m ranking it up there with the best from the austro/ancap tradition. It summarizes my views so completely that I could have written it myself if I had the author’s talent, time, and motivation. Highly recommended!

Physio, kudos for starting this forum! Hopefully it picks up momentum.
Last edited by z1235 on Fri Apr 06, 2018 6:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Clayton
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:24 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by Clayton » Fri Apr 06, 2018 2:11 pm

z1235 wrote:
Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:45 pm
z1235 (or “z”) from the old mises.org forum and LibertyHQ.
Welcome, z.
Physio, kudos for starting this forum! Hopefully it picks up momentum.
Ditto.

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z1235
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:07 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by z1235 » Fri Apr 06, 2018 2:54 pm

Clayton wrote:
Fri Apr 06, 2018 2:11 pm
Welcome, z.
Thx c! Likewise.

AfterModernism
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 9:39 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by AfterModernism » Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:19 pm

Hello, Mises UK Form

I live somewhere near the Pacific Coast. I always have trouble classifying my political views, but if my views can be summed up in one word, its decentralization; in a phrase: "Small is beautiful." My social views are mixture of "far-right" and "far-left." I'm not a certainly not fan of the organized LGBT lobby and feminism, and I prefer traditional art and architecture to the postmodern status quo. I care about my own people and would consider myself a pluralistic ethnonationalist (but definitely not a white nationalist.) However I'm also opposed to christianity and am quite skeptical of corporations, I have no problem with homosexuality per se, nor with drug use, prostitution, and pornography, and I think climate change is real, I even consider myself an anti-capitalist. I agree with libertarians on most substantive issues, (taxation is theft, the market is better than governments, freedom of association, privatize roads etc.) I don't call myself a libertarian because I am not particularly ideological, and have other concerns unrelated to the Liberty movement. If anyone calls me a libertarian, I would not object. Another difference with libertarians I have is that I don't see unlimited economic growth as intrinsically good, and I am skeptical of corporations and new technology. This is still a cursory description of my worldview, and I am quite dissatisfied with what I have written so far; I'll end this introduction with my favorite libertarian media.

My favorite libertarian site by far is Attack the System, my favorite libertarian podcast is the Tom Woods Show, and my favorite libertarian author is probably Murray Rothbard.

Have a nice day.

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z1235
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:07 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by z1235 » Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 am

AfterModernism wrote:
Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:19 pm
Another difference with libertarians I have is that I don't see unlimited economic growth as intrinsically good, and I am skeptical of corporations and new technology.
Welcome!
"Growth" is a fiat money phenomenon. Everything "grows" when measured in inflated monetary units.
On technology... Deferred consumption is (saved) capital which is employed towards increased productivity (new technology). This process is inextricable from a free market and capitalism. A basic human goal is to minimize scarcity and to do/get more with less labor/effort. Of course, in a free society everyone is free to use as much or as little technology as they want on their own property (like the Amish, for instance), so one's distaste for technological progress doesn't necessarily preclude them from being a libertarian.

AfterModernism
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 9:39 pm

Re: Introductions

Post by AfterModernism » Tue Apr 10, 2018 4:23 am

z1235 wrote:
Tue Apr 10, 2018 1:57 am
A basic human goal is to minimize scarcity and to do/get more with less labor/effort.
Agreed, I don't think scarcity and labor will ever completely disappear.
Of course, in a free society everyone is free to use as much or as little technology as they want on their own property (like the Amish, for instance), so one's distaste for technological progress doesn't necessarily preclude them from being a libertarian.
Then we agree. I occasionally mistake the beliefs of libertarians (as I see them) for libertarianism itself, thank you for correcting me.

Millennial TM
Posts: 71
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:36 am

Re: Introductions

Post by Millennial TM » Sat Apr 21, 2018 1:22 pm

My name's Colum, I'm a (mature) student at the University of East Anglia. When I first got "into" politics I mostly identified with Marxism, Anarchist-Communism and typically millennial chic anti-capitalism/anti-fascism. However, I always struggled with the antagonism between liberty and equality, as well as the problem of revolution i.e. why so many well-meaning utopian revolutions unfailingly turn into liberty-crushing hellholes. I also found it difficult to swallow the justice of private property for the longest time, it always seemed to me unjust that some people could be born 'dispossessed' and couldn't freely sleep on the ground without breaking the law. Fortunately, my ever curious mind lead me to a range of 'libertarian-shaded' thinkers and tendencies that served to hack away at my old hang-ups over equality, property and revolution. Russell Kirk's 'Conservative Mind' played a key role, instilling me with a great respect for inheritance, ancient privilege, familial ties etc. Reading Burke and de Maistre turned me against the idea of revolution for good. Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson and Sowell's Basic Economics introduced me to arguments against socialism which, although it took me a long time to accept, planted a seed that would grow to the point where those arguments could no longer be denied. Anarchists outside of the narrow-minded communist/syndicalist tradition - writers like Voltairine de Cleyre, Emile Armand and Max Stirner made me an anarcho-pluralist. Discovering Keith Preston's Attack the System blog lead me embrace secessionism and pluralism more generally.

Some other key events: Although I was originally supportive of the EU (mostly because I love the freedom to travel without visas etc), the post-Brexit political climate taught me that organised anti-racism was just as much of a threat as racism, if not more so at the moment. By this time I was no longer calling myself leftist, and called myself centrist or a syncretist. Witnessing the backlash against Trump and his supporters also made me resolutely anti-anti-fascist (and of course by this I don't mean fascist) and I became very involved in blogs and forums promoting "alt-lite", "new right", "anti-PC" type ideals. I got heavily into the lectures of Jordan B. Peterson, who helped fuel my pro-liberty, anti-revolution drive further. Abandoning socialism and statism I explored other alternatives: georgism, distributism, social credit, mutualism, agorism, and austro-libertarianism. Although my knowledge of economics is insufficient to say anything for certain, the austro-libertarian tradition seems to have got it right. At the time that I was coming to terms with this I discovered the work of Sean Gabb and the libertarian alliance(s), just before the alliance became Mises UK.

Since then I've been absorbing as much natural law and free market theory as I can alongside my Philosophy and Politics degree. I have also formed a Free Speech Society (pending acceptance) with a great gang of 16-18 regular members from various backgrounds, although most members are right-wing in one way or the other (two people identify as left-wings, but they both seem like anti-socialist classical liberals to me).
"And be it indeed that I have erred, my error remaineth with myself"

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Physiocrat
Site Admin
Posts: 281
Joined: Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:25 am

Re: Introductions

Post by Physiocrat » Sat Apr 21, 2018 2:24 pm

Millennial TM wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 1:22 pm
My name's Colum, I'm a (mature) student at the University of East Anglia. When I first got "into" politics I mostly identified with Marxism, Anarchist-Communism and typically millennial chic anti-capitalism/anti-fascism. However, I always struggled with the antagonism between liberty and equality, as well as the problem of revolution i.e. why so many well-meaning utopian revolutions unfailingly turn into liberty-crushing hellholes. I also found it difficult to swallow the justice of private property for the longest time, it always seemed to me unjust that some people could be born 'dispossessed' and couldn't freely sleep on the ground without breaking the law. Fortunately, my ever curious mind lead me to a range of 'libertarian-shaded' thinkers and tendencies that served to hack away at my old hang-ups over equality, property and revolution. Russell Kirk's 'Conservative Mind' played a key role, instilling me with a great respect for inheritance, ancient privilege, familial ties etc. Reading Burke and de Maistre turned me against the idea of revolution for good. Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson and Sowell's Basic Economics introduced me to arguments against socialism which, although it took me a long time to accept, planted a seed that would grow to the point where those arguments could no longer be denied. Anarchists outside of the narrow-minded communist/syndicalist tradition - writers like Voltairine de Cleyre, Emile Armand and Max Stirner made me an anarcho-pluralist. Discovering Keith Preston's Attack the System blog lead me embrace secessionism and pluralism more generally.

Some other key events: Although I was originally supportive of the EU (mostly because I love the freedom to travel without visas etc), the post-Brexit political climate taught me that organised anti-racism was just as much of a threat as racism, if not more so at the moment. By this time I was no longer calling myself leftist, and called myself centrist or a syncretist. Witnessing the backlash against Trump and his supporters also made me resolutely anti-anti-fascist (and of course by this I don't mean fascist) and I became very involved in blogs and forums promoting "alt-lite", "new right", "anti-PC" type ideals. I got heavily into the lectures of Jordan B. Peterson, who helped fuel my pro-liberty, anti-revolution drive further. Abandoning socialism and statism I explored other alternatives: georgism, distributism, social credit, mutualism, agorism, and austro-libertarianism. Although my knowledge of economics is insufficient to say anything for certain, the austro-libertarian tradition seems to have got it right. At the time that I was coming to terms with this I discovered the work of Sean Gabb and the libertarian alliance(s), just before the alliance became Mises UK.

Since then I've been absorbing as much natural law and free market theory as I can alongside my Philosophy and Politics degree. I have also formed a Free Speech Society (pending acceptance) with a great gang of 16-18 regular members from various backgrounds, although most members are right-wing in one way or the other (two people identify as left-wings, but they both seem like anti-socialist classical liberals to me).
Welcome aboard. That was an interesting read. Btw did you attend the Mises UK conference in January?
The atoms tell the atoms so, for I never was or will but atoms forevermore be.

Yours sincerely,

Physiocrat

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