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Re: AI and the rise of China: this is the New New World

Posted: Wed May 16, 2018 1:49 am
by Clayton
Below is a technical talk. Even though it is quite technical, I want to say that this is the most exciting development in Deep Learning/AI that I've seen in a long time. DeepMind introduced "neural Turing machines" (NTM) which are a neural-net based implementation of the classical Turing machine (which is the theoretical model of the general-purpose digital computer, such as the one you are using now, reading this page). The "Memory-Attention-Composition" network (MAC) presented in this video is much more tractable from the point-of-view of real implementation. An NTM can, in priciple, do anything that a MAC can, but the MAC is much simpler to describe, mathematically, and its "programmatic" behavior is much easier to reason about than NTMs. I rank this as the most exciting recent development because it introduces a component that has been glaringly missing from AI until now - some capacity to make indirect inferences based on a training-regimen that looks like standard AI training (supervised learning).



For good measure, here's a picture of the MAC cell:

Image

Re: AI and the rise of China: this is the New New World

Posted: Wed May 16, 2018 6:20 pm
by Jon Irenicus
Meanwhile, idiocracy, here we come...

Re: AI and the rise of China: this is the New New World

Posted: Fri May 18, 2018 5:18 pm
by Tom Rogers
Fact: Machines cannot operate independently of human beings.

That being the case, there are three broad possibilities:

(i). Cyborgisation: human beings merge with intelligent machines, evolving the human phenotype.
(ii). Human devolution: humans become dependent on machines, devolving the human phenotype.
(iii). Human supremacy: humans remain masters over machines.

Re: AI and the rise of China: this is the New New World

Posted: Sat May 19, 2018 2:46 am
by Clayton


These chips have the potential to massively speed up (and lower the cost of) the training and running of neural networks - potentially millions of times faster/cheaper than Google's formidable TPUs. Note that these chips do not rely on any speculative breakthroughs, unlike quantum computation which still has dozens of large theoretical and practical hurdles to leap.

Re: AI and the rise of China: this is the New New World

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 10:10 pm
by Clayton
Uh, Did Google Fake Its Big A.I. Demo?

They didn't fake it. But this headline/article is precisely the reason I have been waving the distress flag over the issue of AI since around the end of 2014. The lay person has no way to realistically assess what the AI is or is not capable of. This creates all kinds of potential hazards - legal, commercial, political, social, etc. Changes are coming down the pike so rapidly that it almost defies description. Since 2014, I've read dozens - maybe more than a hundred - papers in the ML/AI field (and related areas in CS). By the time I get up-to-date on one area of ML/AI, there are a half dozen new papers that have dropped. It's staggering. The tech reporting in this field is lagging at least 6 months to a year behind the curve; and only the big headliner technologies like AlphaGo or Duplex ever reach the awareness of mainstream audiences. There's so much more going on right now.